Spider-Man Homecoming EASTER EGGS You Missed + POST-CREDITS SCENES Explained

Spider-Man Homecoming EASTER EGGS You Missed + POST-CREDITS SCENES Explained


Spider-Man: Homecoming is the Spidey reboot
fans have been waiting for and it’s positively crawling with easter eggs and connections
to the web-slinger’s previous appearances on the big and small screen, the Marvel Cinematic
Universe, plus references from over fifty years of Spider-Man history in the comics. Yippee-ki-yay, movie lovers, it’s Jan here,
and there are so many easter eggs in Tom Holland’s first Spider-Man solo movie that, in this
video, I’m going to focus on the toughest-to-spot and best easter eggs and references you might
have missed. I’ve also got some very cool Funko Pops plus
a pack of Spider-Man: Homecoming merchandise to give away. For a chance to win, make sure you subscribe,
turn on your notifications, and leave me a comment below about your favourites easter
eggs or any others you spotted! Just before I start, quick warning there are
spoilers ahead for the movie, so take care if you haven’t seen it yet. Homecoming director Jon Watts has said he
took a lot of inspiration from the original Spider-Man comics and there’s one iconic issue,
Amazing Spider-Man #33, that features prominently in the movie. At one point in the film, Vulture uses his
suit to collapse a warehouse, trapping Spider-Man under a ton of rubble and girders. The way Spider-Man gets out from under the
rubble, motivated by a reflection of himself and the voice of Tony Stark, is similar to
how Peter visualises Uncle Ben in the comic and uses it as a source of inner strength
to help him lift the rubble off himself. And eagle-eyed fans might also remember there
was an homage to this same iconic comic book issue in Captain America: Civil War when Spider-Man
was weighed down by an airport walkway that Captain America smashed on to him. Michael Keaton may not have read any Spider-Man
comics before bringing to life the classic villain, Vulture, but the movie still has
a very cool easter egg to his comic book character. On the Staten Island Ferry, there’s a car
with the license plate SM2-0563, in other words Amazing Spider-Man issue 2, published
May 1963, a comic which featured the first appearances of both Vulture and the Tinkerer,
who’s the character who makes Vulture’s tech in the new movie. The Staten Island ferry event also tips its
hat to the fact that, in the comics, the birthplace of Adrian Toomes, aka Vulture, is Staten Island. And although the look of Michael Keaton’s
Vulture is quite different to his comic book counterpart, the costume designers have said
they deliberately added a straggly fur collar to his jacket as a nod to both the ‘feathers
on a real vulture’ and the original Vulture design by artist Steve Ditko. Homecoming introduces the villainous Shocker
to the MCU and there’s a subtle homage to his yellow-diamond patterned costume in the
comics via the sleeves on the jacket worn by the first Shocker Jackson Brice, and the
second Shocker Herman Schultz also has them. Donald Glover’s character Aaron Davis tries
to buy some tech from Shocker and later Spider-Man interrogates him in a car park to learn more
about what Vulture and his crew are up to. Spidey’s suit analysis on Davis reveals his
alias is The Prowler, a nod to his comic book alter ego. And during the interrogation, Davis mentions
he has a nephew in the neighbourhood. In the comics, Davis is the uncle of Miles
Morales who, like Peter Parker, was bitten by a radioactive spider turning him into a
famous web-crawling superhero. This easter egg works on several levels, firstly
Sony have an animated movie for Miles Morales in the works. Secondly, the nephew-mention suggests that
Miles Morales could also exist either in the MCU or Sony’s live-action Spider-Man universe. And finally, it’s interesting because Donald
Glover and his fans campaigned for Glover to play Spider-Man before the character’s
first movie reboot, and later that led him to voice Miles Morales in the Ultimate Spider-Man
TV series. Spider-Man: Homecoming very obviously connects
to the MCU with the opening scenes reliving moments from Captain America: Civil War from
Peter Parker’s point-of-view. But there’s a less-obvious call-back to an
earlier MCU movie that I particularly enjoyed. Now, during this early fight scene with a
group of criminals breaking into some ATMs, their masks very obviously evoke the Avengers,
but there’s a more subtle joke and reference you might not have noticed. As Spidey takes the thugs out, at one point
he makes Thor punch Hulk, which is a nice reverse of how Hulk smashed Thor at the end
of the Battle of New York in the first Avengers movie. By the way, given the criminals are wearing
Avengers masks, I also liked the identity theft joke here in the background. When Happy Hogan is arranging the move of
Avengers tech like Tony’s Hulkbuster armor from Age of Ultron and the prototype of Captain
America’s new shield, he also mentions something we’ve not yet seen in the MCU, that is, Thor’s
Magic Belt, the Norse name for which Happy gives up trying to pronounce. The belt is also known in the comics as the
“belt of strength” or the “power belt” and it gives the wearer incredible strength. I wonder whether the belt is just a fun easter
egg or something we might see in a future movie, for example Ragnarok or Infinity War? There’s a call-back to the first Captain America
movie at the end of the scene on Coney Island when the camera pans up to the Cyclone roller
coaster. In that First Avenger film, just before Steve
Rogers and Bucky zip-wire down to the HYDRA train carrying Zola, they reminisce about
how Steve threw up on that same roller coaster ride when they were younger. In Spider-Man: Homecoming, actor Kenneth Choi
returns to the MCU, this time as Principal Morita. Choi previously played the role of Jim Morita,
a member of the Howling Commandos in the first Captain America movie. And there’s a clever easter egg to his previous
role with a picture of Jim Morita in the Principal’s office, suggesting the two men are related. By the way, this isn’t the first time Marvel
has reused actors for new roles in the MCU. Alfre Woodard had a minor role as Miriam Sharpe
in Captain America: Civil War where she confronted Tony Stark as the mother of a son who was
killed in the Battle of Sokovia. Then, later that same year, she had a much
larger role as the villainous Mariah Dillard in the Netflix series Luke Cage. And Martin Starr who plays teacher Mr Harrington
in Spider-Man: Homecoming previously cameo-ed in 2008’s The Incredible Hulk as a computer
nerd, who was said to be Amadeus Cho in the movie novelisation. Spider-Man: Homecoming really delves deep
into the capabilities of Tony Stark’s Spider-Man suit and, after Peter and Ned hack into the
suit to remove the “training wheels” protocol, we next discover that the suit is also equipped
with an AI voice to assist Peter with the suit’s functions. Peter calls the “suit lady” program Karen
and she’s actually voiced by actress Jennifer Connelly who played Marvel character Betty
Ross in director Ang Lee’s 2003 Hulk movie, a pre-MCU movie released by Universal. But what’s even more interesting and a sort
of MCU in-joke is that Jennifer Connelly is married to Paul Bettany, who played J.A.R.V.I.S.,
the original voice inside Iron Man’s suit, before he became Vision in Avengers: Age of
Ultron. After Ned learns that Peter is the real Spider-Man,
he starts asking him what powers he has, for example, whether he can summon an army of
spiders. This is a curious question because Spider-Man
did indeed use that threat against a villain in issue 57 of Marvel Adventures Spider-Man. And when Ned suggests that Peter should go
and stand on the edge of a building and see how far he can shoot his webs, it immediately
made me think of the first Sam Raimi Spider-Man movie where Tobey Maguire’s Spidey literally
does just that as he’s learning about the extent of his abilities. There’s another fun homage to that first Sam
Raimi movie and the kiss the web-crawler shared with Mary Jane as he hung upside-down after
rescuing her. During the Washington Monument rescue in this
film, there’s a moment where Spider-Man is hanging upside down after he’s just saved
Liz from the plummeting elevator. Spidey’s suit lady Karen even says, “This
is your chance Peter, kiss her”, in a nice call-back to his upside-down kiss with MJ
back in 2002. And earlier, en route to Washington, there
was a road sign warning about the Triskelion Clean-Up. The Triskelion is the SHIELD headquarters
built on Theodore Roosevelt Island and the mention via the road sign is a link back to
the events of Captain America: The Winter Soldier where the Triskelion was severely
damaged when one of the Project Insight helicarriers crashed into the building in the movie’s finale. Spider-Man: Homecoming introduces the Department
of Damage Control properly in the MCU, although you might remember that the organization appeared
on a news report ticker playing in the background during the very first Iron Man movie and also
got a mention in Agents of SHIELD. In the comics, Damage Control is an organization
initially owned by Tony Stark and Wilson Fisk and founded by Anne-Marie Hoag, who’s played
by Tyne Daly in Homecoming where she has a very similar look to her comic book counterpart. Interestingly, Marvel announced a comedy TV
series called “Damage Control” back in 2015. It’s unclear whether this is still on the
cards, in particular after NBC cancelled “Powerless”, a comedy set in the DC universe that explored
a similar premise about how ordinary people deal with the fallout from superhero activities. We learn in Homecoming that Tony Stark has
sold off Avengers Tower in Manhattan and is moving upstate to the New Avengers Facility. And we get a quick cameo by DUM-E, one of
Tony Stark’s two helper robots from the Iron Man movies, last seen mangled up and being
driven away by Tony at the end of Iron Man 3. There’s another Iron Man easter egg thanks
to the design of the T-shirt Peter wears when he goes to see Tony Stark at the New Avengers
Facility. It has the exact same science joke as the
T-shirt that Pepper Potts wore in Iron Man 3, which is especially fitting as, after Peter
leaves, Pepper emerges from the press conference where she’s been waiting for him. By the way, the new suit that Tony shows Peter
in this scene is also a nice tease for the Iron Spider costume. Comic book artist Mark Bagley, who’s known
for his work on titles including The Amazing Spider-Man and Ultimate Spider-Man, gets a
shout-out via graffiti on a building in the background while Spidey’s on the phone to
Happy Hogan. Following Tony Stark and Aunt May’s flirty
first meeting in Captain America: Civil War, Tony continues his flirtation in Homecoming,
this time via a video Peter shoots on his cell phone; though May later says she’s not
a fan of ‘that Tony Stark’. This is all a nod to Robert Downey Jr and
Marisa Tomei’s real-life relationship in the 90s and also their on-screen relationship
in the rom-com “Only You”. But Tony’s not the only guy enamoured with
May – both the bodega owner and the waiter at the Thai restaurant feel the same way. All of which is a pointed contrast to May’s
previous movie and some of her comic-book incarnations. Aunt May’s joke about a turkey meatloaf recipe
is a little call-back to a humorous scene in the first Amazing Spider-Man where Andrew
Garfield’s Peter Parker arrives back home ravenous and eats Aunt May’s meat loaf, declaring
it’s the best meat loaf ever. And when May and Peter go out for Thai food,
right next door to the restaurant there’s a little nod to Thor’s homeland via the Korean
Church of Asgard. The work of John Hughes was a particular inspiration
for Homecoming director Jon Watts and there are several moments in the movie which reference
classic films by Hughes. For example, Zendaya’s character Michelle
channels Ally Sheedy’s outcast character Allison from The Breakfast Club. And, like Allison in the 1985 coming-of-age
classic, in Homecoming Michelle spends time in detention, though apparently she doesn’t
have to be there/neither of them has to be there. And there are also a couple of homages to
the 1986 film Ferris Bueller’s Day Off as well. First, there’s the scene where Peter races
after Shocker through a suburban neighbourhood. Peter’s run through gardens, past barbecues,
dogs and children is Jon Watts’ ode to the classic teen comedy by John Hughes, where
Ferris Bueller had to race home to get there before his family. In fact, we even see a little clip of Ferris’s
own race against the clock on a big TV in one of the gardens that Peter Parker rushes
through and Peter even says ‘great movie’ as he runs by. The very final post-credits scene featuring
Captain America’s humorous PSA about the virtues of patience is a very meta-moment and joke
by the filmmakers to all of us in the audience who’ve become accustomed to sitting through
the credits in any Marvel movie for the chance to see a little tease to a future MCU film. Captain America pokes fun at us with the scene
in a similar spirit to the fourth-wall-breaking joke in the post-credits of Ferris Bueller’s
Day Off, which was, of course, directly spoofed in 2016’s Deadpool. There was, of course, another after-credits
scene which featured the villain Mac Gargan and there was a cool tease to his comic book
alter ego of the Scorpion via the scorpion tattoo on his neck. The scene sets up a much bigger role for Gargan
in the sequel and his mention of having friends on the outside who want to take out Spider-Man
could be a tease to the supervillain squad the Sinister Six. Homecoming already introduced three characters
who’ve been members of the Sinister Six in the comics; Vulture, Scorpion and Shocker,
so, this is nicely half-way to a full Sinister Six crew. Sony has been hoping to make a Sinister Six
movie for a while now and it’s not hard to think that these characters could be spun
off eventually into a separate movie. A little reveal at the end of the movie by
Michelle’s character is that her friends call her “MJ”. This feels like a bit of a joke by the filmmakers
about the persistent rumours during production that Zendaya was going to be playing Mary
Jane. It’s not actually a “Mary Jane” reveal because
all she’s saying is that her nickname is “MJ” even though Spidey fans around the world will
know that MJ is, of course, synonymous with “Mary Jane”. With the filmmakers shying away, for the moment,
from using various characters from the Sam Raimi trilogy and the Amazing Spider-Man movies,
it doesn’t seem likely that we’ll see a real Mary Jane for a while. Of course, Marvel might also try to find a
way to make Michelle into Mary Jane with a trick like making “Mary Jane” her middle name
and, therefore, the reason for her MJ nickname. Mary Jane’s classic nickname of “Tiger” for
Peter Parker gets some great visual shout-outs at the high school via several Homecoming
banners that include the word “Tiger”, plus at one point, I noticed someone in a tiger
costume running around the school in the background. “Face it Tiger, you just hit the jackpot”
were Mary Jane’s first words to Peter Parker in the comics and Kirsten Dunst’s MJ said
“Go get ’em, tiger” to Tobey Maguire’s Peter at the very end of Spider-Man 2. And to round off the very self-aware nature
of this Spider-Man movie, Homecoming even integrated the theme tune from the original
60s Spider-Man TV show into the opening Marvel logo intro with a composition by Michael Giacchino. So, what was your favourite easter egg or
moment in Spider-Man: Homecoming and were there any other references I missed? Be sure to leave a comment about the movie
and subscribe for a chance to win either a Spider-Man Funko Pop or some cool official
merchandise. I’ll announce the winners on an upcoming video,
so make sure you’ve got your notifications turned on to receive all my new videos. And if you enjoyed this, your support is really
appreciated, so hit that thumbs-up button and check out some more videos you might like
here. Congratulations to the first winner of my
Wonder Woman giveaway who won both The Art and Making of the Film and the official movie
novelization. If you’re the person on the screen right now,
send me a message on YouTube or via my email on my About page so I can send you the prize. Thanks for watching and see ya next time! Yippee-ki-yay, movie lovers!

19 comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *