You Can’t Just Google

You Can’t Just Google


I- got my paper on social media back. Yeah? And? Bombed it! Badly. I mean how is that possible? I Googled “Social Media,” I found all these awesome websites to quote from, I even cited them. Well, you can’t just use Google. Did you try searching in the library’s databases? Wait, what databases? Our library has databases? I didn’t- This is news to me. How did you find out about them? They’re on the library’s website. It’s also on that guide they told us about in class. There’s a ton of good information and helpful things about searching the databases on there. So what? So I shouldn’t use
Google at all? Just the databases? Googling is great for some things and everyone does it but it’s not so great for college assignments. Okay, but- Why? College is about preparing us to be respected professionals. If you just Google, then you’re missing out on over half of the information available. Yeah, but- It’s Google! Google only searches the tip of the iceberg and sometimes it doesn’t even do that very well. Google is basically a popularity contest, not a judge of what’s useful. Anyway, our assignment sheet did say we needed to use scholarly sources and credible information But what are scholarly sources? How can I tell if something’s credible, Isn’t everything on the internet credible? No, not everything! Scholarly sources are written by experts in their field and the articles have been peer reviewed. Reviewers make recommendations
regarding the information and sometimes even reject the articles if the research wasn’t done correctly. Also, credible information should be current, you should be able to verify the author as an expert in their field, and you should be able to locate where the author got their information. Okay, well nobody told me about all that. And what, you can’t find those on Google? Remember, Google is popularity contest. Let’s do a search on “Social Media.” [typing] [Man]: Well, hold up. Wha- what’s with this site? Wikipedia has references, and it’s updated frequently. Didn’t you just say that credible information should be current and provide references? You might read stuff on Wikipedia to give you an idea of the topic, but you shouldn’t use it to support your arguments. Anyone can put anything on the Internet. [Woman]: You should always be able to search for the author of an article and see who they work for, if they are affiliated with a school or organization, and their educational background. It’s a good way to determine if they’re knowledgeable in their field. Wikipedia doesn’t list the authors of its articles, so there’s no way of knowing who wrote it. I mean- I guess that makes sense. So, do you ever use Google? Sure, I use Google but I don’t just Google it. I might use it to see what people are saying about my topic but I use Google along with my database searches to make sure I have the best sources for my assignment. [Woman]: The databases are full of information you can’t find on Google. Plus it’s way easier to find credible sources in a database. Hmm, Okay. At least now I know what to do for the next assignment. If you need help, just ask the librarians at Columbus State. That’s what they’re there for.

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